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TEAR THEM DOWN OR LEAVE THEM UP? – PART THREE

The first two parts of this series were very much emotionally driven by yours truly. Part 3 will conclude the series, and offer facts in support of my position that Confederate monuments and memorials should remain in place.

According to an article on townhall.com, written by Jack Kerwick, on May 24, 2017, many of his readers, including conservatives, called for the taking down of Confederate monuments. Their reasons boiled down to the following:

  1. The Confederates fought in defense of slavery.
  2. Slavery is immoral.
  3. Therefore, Confederates were immoral.
  4. Immoral behavior should never be publicly honored.
  5. Thus, by way of 3 and 4 above, Confederates should not be publicly honored.

According to Kerwick, while slavery was a major factor in the fighting of the War between the States, number 1 above is incorrect. Most Confederate soldiers, as well as prominent generals, including, most notably, Robert E. Lee, did not own slaves by the time that the war was raging. Kerwick also writes that both the laity and scholars realized that the complexity of the American Civil War defied all attempts to reduce it to such simple-minded, one-dimensional caricatures of the sort advanced by those who would attribute to Confederates, a single, nefarious motive: the love for slavery. Or the desire to do evil as I pointed out in Part 2.

Next, in his article, Kerwick gets rather analytical. The second premise that slavery is immoral is irrelevant. Without premise 1 above, you cannot reach premise 3. Thus, the immorality of the Confederates cannot be established through 1 and 2, 3 cannot be concluded, and thus, 4 and 5 cannot be adhered to.

For those folks who will have none of the above, those folks whose hatred has so overwhelmed them to the point that anyone who lived in the south at the time of the Civil War is, to an extreme, anti-American, immoral, and anti-people of color, are not going to listen to reason and will continue their barrage of hate. In fact, in some instances, I have read between the lines and have detected a hatred for the south and those of us who have lived in the south all our lives. While I can’t look into a person’s heart and interpret what’s in it, I can read their words and many of their words can be interpreted as overwhelming hate.

Kerwick asks us to assume the above, that every single Southern man and woman who took up the cause of secession was committed to perpetuating the institution of slavery, and that the Confederate symbols are monuments to “White Supremacy.”

If Confederate symbols deserve to be purged from the public, then so do virtually all the symbols of Western civilization.

The roots of what today is recognized as Western civilization are to be found in ancient Greece. Though they weren’t the first of the West’s philosophers, Plato and Aristotle enjoy the distinction of being among the greatest. Western philosophy, and even Christian theology would be inconceivable without these two. Yet even Plato’s ideal Republic included slaves, and Aristotle articulated a defense of “natural slavery,” the enslavement of those who by nature were suited to be slaves.

Since slavery is immoral, then the reasoning of the anti-Confederates demands that Plato and Aristotle be given the same treatment as Generals Lee, Stonewall Jackson, Jefferson Davis, and every other prominent Confederates. Also, all public commemorations of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, James Madison, and many other Founding Fathers involved with slavery are immoral as well.

Thus, in addition to monuments and statues commemorating prominent Confederates, states, cities, schools, streets, and parks named after this nation’s Founding Fathers should also be removed or renamed.

Kerwick cites many other examples, and if those examples were followed, the United States of America would be transformed into something unrecognizable. The left, though, would probably like that because they hate this country and anyone living in this country who does not agree with them on the issues.

According to Kendall Will Sterling, in an article dated July 27, 2015, on richmond.com, the story these symbols tell is more nuanced than what we typically hear. It is said that the South seceded to perpetuate slavery, and yet six slave states sent men to die for the North, and the Southern states rejected an offer from Lincoln that would have made slavery permanent in exchange for their return to the Union. While many Northern states had ended slavery by 1860, many had also passed, “black laws,” a forerunner of Jim Crow, which placed tight restrictions on blacks and often forbade them from even living in the state. Furthermore, West Virginia was admitted to the Union as a slave state in 1863, and slaves in that and other Northern states had to wait until 1865, two years after the Emancipation Proclamation, for their freedom.

Sterling concludes that slavery was more than just a Southern problem; it was an American problem.

Instead of removing all vestiges of the Confederacy, Sterling suggests that we use these statues and memorials to start a new conversation, one that acknowledges the roles of everyone involved and offers hope for our nation and its people, both black and white.

Fat chance that any liberals are going to agree to implementing any such conversations. The left is not interested in solving problems, they just want to destroy the United States of America and all those people within it who don’t toe their line.

Most of us recognize Nathan Bedford Forest as a slave owner and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. But are we aware that Forrest’s 45 slaves rode and fought alongside him as equals, and that their loyalty was such that they remained with him even after he gave them their freedom papers. Do people also know that the Klan’s original purpose was to serve as a volunteer police force against rampant crime in the occupied South. Also, in 1870, when the Klan morphed into a terrorist organization, Forrest resigned and ordered the group disbanded. Softened by an encounter with his God, Forrest spent his final years advocating for political and social advancement for black Americans. When he died in 1877, more than 3,000 blacks lined up to pay their respects as part of his funeral procession.

Sterling further suggests that we let the statue of Robert E. Lee, and the schools that bear his name, remind us all of a Sunday in 1865 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, where Lee worshiped when in Richmond. That Sunday, with the wounds of the war still raw, a black man walked down the aisle of St. Paul’s and knelt to receive Communion. The whites in attendance weren’t certain if they could, or should, take Communion. For a moment, no one knew what to do. Then came a rustle, the scrape of boots on the floorboards, and the congregation looked up to see Lee walking down the aisle to kneel beside that black man, by his own example teaching those around him the way of respect.

The plight of men such as Nathan Bedford Forrest reminds me of the Apostle Paul. Paul, formerly called Saul, was a persecutor of Christians. On a journey from Jerusalem to Damascus, Saul was stuck down and blinded by God because God was calling him to do his work, the spreading of the Gospel of Jesus Christ throughout the world as it was known at that time. Saul became the Apostle Paul, revered and studied by Christians all over the world.

I’m against the taking down and/or the demolition of monuments and/or memorials erected to honor prominent Confederates. While I do acknowledge that there are two distinct sides, I don’t want this section of our history to be diminished.

The Civil War should be taught in schools and should be remembered, lest we ever again make the mistake of splitting up the great Unites States of America.

Will anyone on the left plus those conservatives who believe that these memorials should come down, read my three articles and attempt to examine both sides? Of course not. And if any liberals do take a chance and decide to read what I have written, will they acknowledge and respect my writings and my opinions? Of course not, once again. I will be subjected to the continued ridicule and hate that liberals have shown me in the past.

Why do I continue, you may ask? Because I like doing this. Simple, but true.

Note: Here are links to articles where the information outlined above was obtained.

In Defense of Honoring the Confederacy: A Response to the Cultural Cleansers.

Pro and Con, Should Confederate Monuments be Removed.

 

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AMERICAN HISTORY TAUGHT IN OUR SCHOOLS

We have been hearing and reading for quite some time how those who were responsible for the establishment of the United States of America might not have been such great people. The main reason for this was because they owned slaves.  The honoring or even the discussing of men such as Christopher Columbus, George Washington, John Smith (Jamestown), Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, etc. was brought into question. For to do so, might offend people, especially blacks, who most likely descended from slaves.

The Civil War was a tumultuous time in this nation’s history, and the splitting  of the Union led to reverberations that can still be felt today. This is  something we never want to repeat. Are we teaching our children about it, so they can get an understanding of why we don’t ever want to go back there? Not from what I’m hearing and reading. To teach students about the Civil War might be offensive to some, especially black students. So, we refrain from teaching the history of the War Between the States so as not to offend.

During World War II, Japanese Americans were rounded up and relocated to camps in the interior U.S. These individuals lived on the Pacific coast, and sixty-two of them were American Citizens. These actions were ordered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt shortly after Imperial Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. I have a liberal friend, not Japanese, that keeps pointing this out to me in her quest to prove that the United States is a racist, evil, xenophobic, misogynist nation. Have I left anything out?

Following the detonation of the atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing countless lives, but  saving more lives in the long run, and winning the war for the Americans, liberals now throw this back in our facse stating that America is a racist, evil, xenophobic, misogynist nation. Again, have I left anything out?

The United States of America was birthed in 1776, approximately 240 years ago. Using biblical stats, our civilization is around 6,000 years old. We’re a  young country. Even though I firmly believe that God was steering our founding fathers in the establishment of this great nation, our founding fathers were mere mortals, and in establishing the United States of America, they were doing something that have never been tried before. In other words, it was a radical experiment.

With the creation of the United States of America and the constitution which allowed for freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, the right to bear arms against a possible oppressive government, we put in place tools in which we could use to “right our wrongs” when wrongs most certainly would arise.

Because new Americans were, as I indicated above, mere mortals, it stands to reason that mistakes in the development of this experimental nation would be made. At times we would flip to the ways of the old world. But because of the constitution and the foundation that was in place, we gave the American citizens freedom of speech, freedom of expression, freedom of the press, freedom to practice their religion or not practice religion. And because of these freedoms that were given to the American people through our founding fathers, guided by God, the American people put an end to slavery in 1865, less than 100 years after our nation was founded in 1776. In 1920, because of the constitution and the freedoms which were given to the America people, women were given the right to vote. Because blacks and other minorities were still considered second class citizens and didn’t have the rights they were originally granted under our constitution, Civil Rights legislation was passed in 1964.

Following the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the women’s movement began in 1970, whereby it became the norm for women to seek careers other than the formerly traditional careers held by women of secretary, school teacher, social worker, and nurse. It became commonplace for women to become doctors, lawyers, business executives, engineers, etc.

Because of the Constitution of the United States of America, put in place by our founding fathers, this country has been able to evolve to the point where every man, woman, and child has a chance to be anything they desire. In obtaining their goals and desires, not everyone is going to have the same path. Some will have it easy, others not so easy. Just remember, God never promised any of us a rose garden. Follow him, to the exclusion of everything else, and he will guide you and watch over you.

Back to our topic, we don’t appear to be teaching our children about the founding fathers and how this country was established because we’re afraid of offending certain groups. Instead, the American history taught in schools is full of America’s mistakes and how this country is racist, homophobic, misogynistic, and many other things. Thus, so many of our young people, particularly those we consider millennials, have no appreciation for how this country was founded, and are following philosophies such as socialism and even communism as ways that the United States should go forward as a nation. Redistribution of wealth, from each according to his ability and to each according to his need, tax the evil rich, screw big business, etc. have become the mantra of those who seek to destroy the cornerstones in which this country was built.

What is not realized by groups that are offended because our founding fathers may have owned slaves, because we were a nation which once recognized slavery, because we once were a nation where women were not allowed to vote, etc. is that the very bones of this nation provided the tools to right our wrongs. The founding documents, created by the founding fathers enabled the United States of America to eliminate slavery when slavery was prevalent everywhere on the planet. The documents created by the founding fathers enabled the United States of America to give women the right to vote when there was no other place on the planet where women had the right to vote. The documents created by the founding fathers enabled the United States of America to pass legislation to further give those other than white males the status and opportunities they rightly deserve.

But again, liberals have determined that it is politically incorrect to teach our children about our founding fathers, about the constitution, about the Civil War (something that we don’t want to ever repeat), about World War II where the Americans defeated two of the most evil regimes to ever exist in the history of the world. Instead, we’re teaching our children about how America is a racist, misogynist, xenophobic, homophobic nation which deserves to be weakened and eventually destroyed. Have I left anything out?

For the unfathomable mess that has been created, I don’t  blame individual teachers. They’re given textbooks and ordered to teach out of those textbooks. However, I do blame the teachers’ unions and other teachers’ organizations who side with the left.

Once our citizens become totally ignorant of how this country was founded, we will no longer have a United States of America. We will cease to be the land of the free and the home of the brave. We will have long forgotten the mechanisms that were established so that we would be able right our wrongs. We will have reverted back to old world ways, the ways those who persevered to come to the new world left behind.

The United States of America is a 250 year experiment that is on the brink of failure because we are not teaching future generations about American History and how to sustain our Republic.

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