Tag Archives: teachers’ lounges

THE WEEK THAT WAS

For those of you who are not aware, I’m an only child. Growing up, I had no siblings to spar with, so I never learned the art of taking up for myself. As a result, all of my life, I’ve allowed people to run over me.

After becoming a conservative blogger and putting myself and my views out there, I was attacked. The first time it happened, I was shook up. The person attacking me was from my hometown and a PhD. It appeared that she didn’t fully read my post. Her attacks were your typical accusations that liberals make to conservatives…”you hate the poor, you hate minorities, etc.” They weren’t even closely related to the topic of my post. I invited her to sit down with me to discuss the issues face to face. Of course, that ended our “back and forth” because “little miss PhD” wouldn’t think of lowering herself to have a face to face with someone who had only a bachelor’s degree.

After the online encounter, I asked myself whether or not I was able to handle this kind of stuff. I decided that if I was going to pursue political blogging with hopes of making some money that I would have to. A little over a year later, I can honestly say that the ridicule directed at me from those on the left doesn’t upset me. It’s part of it.

Last week I found myself trolling on some liberal websites and social media sites. One was a liberal Facebook site that distributed a photo where presidential candidate and governor of Ohio, John Kasich said he thought teachers’ lounges should be eliminated because when spending time in the teachers’ lounge, teachers’ gripe to each other about their work and this griping was not good for their well-being or something to that effect. (I’m not sure exactly what he said, but it was something in-line with the foregoing). On the thread, I indicated that I didn’t agree with the governor. Instead, I though teachers’ lounges should be open 24/7 so the teachers can stay there and grip to their hearts’ content. Then I wouldn’t have to listen to them. I have friends and acquaintances who are public school teachers and most every one of them gripe incessantly about their jobs to the point of often monopolizing conversations and demanding to be the center of attention and wanting sympathy. The point I was trying to make was that everyone has job issues. There are lots of folks out there who are overworked and underpaid. Just like everything else in this world no job is perfect. Public school teachers are not the only ones who have work related problems, but it seems like they do the most griping and, of course, they can’t be bothered to ask a non-teacher in the group how his or her day or week went, or how his or her job is growing.

As you can imagine the other commenters were attaching horns and a tail to me. After that, the comments about how horrible the “poor, poor, pitiful teachers had it while everyone else, especially the Republicans, was eating cake slowed down to a crawl.

Another liberal thread I found myself visiting was from the Robert Reich Facebook fan page. The former Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton, as you can guess, is a big proponent of the newly proposed overtime regulations. Secretary Reich began his post by saying that Americans are working longer hours than the citizens of almost any other advanced economy. Furthermore, he’s feels that it is bad for our health. He quotes a study that indicates that people who put in long hours at the office are 33% more likely to suffer a stroke than their colleagues who clock out earlier. Even those who work just over 40 hours per week bear a significant increase in stroke risk. The study also indicates that sitting for long periods increases one’s risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and early death. (Guess I had better get up and do a couple of minutes on my mini-trampoline).

This post triggered a plethora of responses, obviously from liberals, advocating more over-time pay, more vacation days, shorter work week, etc. In summary, the commenters appeared to want to give as little as possible and have the government provide extensively for them. They want shorter work weeks, more vacation time, increased benefits, and college tuition paid in full for their little darlings. Again, they want to work as little as possible for all this stuff. Who’s going to make up the shortfall? The rich, of course.

I have previously authored three articles indicating why this mandatory overtime is not a good thing and should be examined very carefully. In fact, I believe this will totally and completely destroy the American workplace. To read these articles, do a search on “overtime.”

This time, my posts did stop the whiny comments.

The comments on both of these posts say to me that folks out there expect the government to provide them a perfect job plus meet all of their needs. In accepting these comments, we’re destroying the individualism in which this country was founded on. The founding fathers, through the U.S. Constitution, gave Americans freedom to make choices and succeed as they wished. Success, however, can’t be guaranteed.

Once upon a time, if you had job issues and felt that your job was not providing you with the type of life you desired, you took steps to perhaps change jobs. I know that’s easier said than done, but that’s what normal folks do. In other words, people took responsibility for their situations and took steps to change those situations.

For all the griping school teachers out there, have you ever thought about a career change? Maybe teaching just isn’t for you. Would you be happier in administration or maybe in a private sector job? Since you’re already a teacher, you do have an education. For those of you who have corporate jobs where the bosses are jerks and you’re overworked and underpaid, have you ever thought of looking for something else; in other words, taking charge of your life instead of expecting the government to come along and make things all perfect for you? Update that resume, spend time on the employment websites, work on your interviewing skills, etc.

I realize that there are probably millions of people out there who are stuck in miserable jobs and have very little recourse. I certainly sympathize with those people and wish with all my heart that things weren’t that way for them. But does anyone think that the government is going to come in, implement all these great regulations, and make life idyllic. Trying to gather up every problem out there and solve it is like playing “whack-a-mole.” You hit one of those suckers into the ground and two pop up. It’s just not possible and won’t happen until Jesus returns to earth and sets up his 1000 year reign.

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ABOUT PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS, SOMETHING WE’RE NOT SUPPOSED TO TALK ABOUT

Depending on whose reading this post, I may ruffle some feathers, but I don’t care. I guess Donald Trump has emboldened me to say what I think, no holds barred, and no apologizes. So, here goes.

Day before Yesterday a story surfaced that Ohio Governor and Republican candidate for President, John Kasich wants to abolish teachers’ lounges. His reasoning is that teachers won’t have a place to go and talk about their problems.

Well, I totally disagree with Governor Kasich, I think teachers’ lounges should be expanded and open 24/7, so they can gripe till their heart’s content. That way, I don’t have to listen to them. I know several public school teachers and I have never heard one of them say that they liked their job. All they do is gripe about how hard they have to work, how they’re underpaid, etc.

In my career, there have been times when I was underpaid. I’ve always had to work hard and throughout a good portion of my career to date, it was normal to work Monday through Saturday and a half-day on Sunday. Of course, now that I’m a small business owner, there’s no such thing as being off. When I’m not eating, sleeping, or doing necessary personal stuff such as grocery shopping and getting my nails and hair done, I’m working. I might have expressed some occasional frustration at having to work so much, but I know I didn’t continually complain like most school teachers do about having to work hard. If I was with one or more school teachers, there was no way anyone but them could complain because they monopolized the conversation with their gripes. No one else could get a work in edgewise.

One time, I was having lunch with a group of people. This was shortly after a new school year had begun. Someone asked the teacher at the table how school was. We then had to hear a litany of how hard she was having to work and how budget cuts had affected the classroom and she was having to use her own money to buy supplies. H-E-L-L-O! I was in a job for about ten years where I had to spend from $500 to $1,000 of my own money yearly for supplies, reference materials, and continuing education. I traveled extensively during this period, and because the company was so cheap, I often times didn’t turn in certain expenses. I almost never turned in tips. If I decided to go to a nice restaurant for a nice dinner, I wouldn’t turn in the full amount. I never quite had enough, though, to deduct on my tax return.

They gripe about being underpaid. Well, it’s not exactly breaking news that school teachers’ salaries are not generous. You knew that when you went into the profession. They grip about being underfunded. Well, I have news for them. A lot of budgets out there, not just education budgets are skimpy. They gripe about having to spend their own money in the classroom. Well, so do I. See my above comments.

Years ago, when I was very underpaid, I told a teacher that I did make a little more money than she did, but it was just that, a little more. And it was. I worked an average of 55 to 60 hours a week, received ten vacation days and seven holidays.

Furthermore, after five or so years, most teachers have what is called “tenure.” In other words, they can’t be let go from their job except for certain types of mis-conduct and then it’s a big thing. In the private sector, one can be let go at the drop of a hat and the company, in most states, is not required to give you a reason. I will clarify by saying that firing someone and not giving them a reason why they were fired is rare. A company doing this on a regular basis is sure to get a reputation and will not attract the best and the brightest people.

A school teacher friend and I were driving back from the beach one Sunday afternoon in the summer and this school teacher friend said to me, “Nancy, you have a perfect job, don’t you?” I let it all out in about a thirty minute diatribe. This poor teacher was cowering and said, “I had no idea, because you never talk about work.”

“That’s right,” I said. “I keep my professional and private lives separate. When I’m away from the job, I really don’t want to be reminded of it. I want to forget about my problems at work. I have no desire to gripe about my job to friends.” After this, she was careful about griping about her job, especially in front of me. But, you could tell that she wanted to.

I had one school teacher friend tell me that she would like to have a job where she didn’t have to take work home. This was in the early nineties, before logging in and working from home because common place. I promptly told her that while I can’t bring company documents home and work on them, it was rare for me to leave work at quitting time. And most weekends, unless I had something else to do, I was in the office working.

One teacher friend of mine replied “well it must be nice” when I took a day, a day of vacation in September after she had just started back to school after summer break. I was very busy that year and was doing a lot of very stressful business travel. I also purchased my house that year and was studying hard to get a professional certification. Up until that September day of vacation, I had only taken two days of vacation and that was to deal with purchasing the house and moving. So that one measly day of vacation was the first I had taken all year where I actually relaxed and did some stuff for me. This particular teacher had just returned to work after having two months off and she makes a smart-ass comment about me taking a day of vacation. Sheesh.
Yeah, I’ve unloaded on school teachers. And while I do acknowledge that they face difficulties in their professions, the rest of us do also. No school teacher I’ve known has ever asked me how my day was, how my week was, or how my job was going. However, they insist on monopolizing every conversation with their griping. Then they wonder why folks don’t like them.

It looks as though Governor Kasich’s comments may be soon forgotten about. Of course, the teachers’ unions won’t forget about them. Like I said, I don’t agree with Governor Kasich. I think they ought to be expanded where hopefully the teachers will stay in them and gripe till they can’t gripe any more, if that’s possible.

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