Tag Archives: Jefferson Davis

TEAR THEM DOWN OR LEAVE THEM UP – PART TWO

In my introduction to what should we do with those pesky monuments commemorating heroes of the Confederacy, I laid out my feelings about the actions of a few folks with whom I’ve come in contact who have moved to the Southeastern United States (the South) from other parts of the country and the attitude that some, not all, have displayed toward southern culture and the southern people.

Since Dylann Roof entered a Charleston, S.C. church in June 2015 and opened fire, killing nine church members, all black, there has been a frenzy by the left to destroy anything relating to the United States Civil War. The reasoning: In some photo, Mr. Roof was seen holding a Confederate battle flag. The left and some members of the right immediately called for the banning of the flag because it was a symbol of hate. Everyone who owned a Confederate battle flag or something depicting the Confederate battle flag, even it was just a belt buckle, was automatically labeled a racist, a white supremacist, a hater, etc. No room for argument. Because the left said it was so, then it must be so. Conservatives from outside the south, and even from within the south were also piling on.

Did I own anything depicting the Confederate battle flag? If I did, it was packed away in some box in the back of the basement. I didn’t like the attitude of the left plus the attitude of some fellow conservatives. While it was determined that Dylann Roof was indeed a racist, white supremacist, and a hater, does that necessarily mean that everyone owning an object depicting the Confederate battle flag was also all of these things? Apparently the left and many conservatives thought so, though. Was explaining that owning a Confederate battle flag or an object depicting a Confederate battle flag, could mean the remembering of heritage, of history? According to the left and other conservatives, absolutely not. These folks wouldn’t even listen to the other side.

Of course, the left would never, ever listen to the other side, and the conservatives were too scared of being labeled a racist if they did listen to the other side and acknowledged the reasoning. In 2015, being labeled a racist by the left was one of the worst things that could happen to an individual.

In the South, there are many monuments in public places honoring Confederate heroes, plus many buildings, schools, streets, and towns are named after prominent southerners living in and around the time of the Civil War. Following the Charleston church tragedy, there has been a movement by the left, and yes, by some conservatives, to destroy everything that is a reminder of the Civil War.

The Alabama legislature has passed a statute indicating that monuments meeting certain criteria cannot be removed from their locations. Of course, this has the left and those sympathetic conservatives up in arms. But guess what, I don’t care, and I’m not the only one.

In New Orleans, a city run by Democrats, headed up by a Democrat mayor, the taking down of statutes honoring prominent Confederate military men and prominent southerners has begun. Earlier this month, a statute of Confederate Army General, Robert E. Lee, was recently brought down to the angst of many people, including me. As a frequent traveler to New Orleans, I have driven around Lee Circle many times. The statute is indeed impressive.

Robert E. Lee graduated with honors from West Point Academy. He was also a prominent general in the United States Army and was set to lead the Union Army in the Civil War. However, General Lee was from Virginia and loved his home state. Because of this, General Lee accepted the position to head up the Confederate Army. He couldn’t bring himself to fight against Virginia. Also, Robert E. Lee hated slavery and had freed his slaves years before the Civil War began.

Liberals have argued that even though Robert E. Lee may have been a “good guy,” he still chose to fight for the south and thus, he was “anti-American, anti-moral, and anti-non white people,” a quote from an individual who is in favor of taking down statutes honoring, in any way, the Confederate States of America.

I’ve also heard that the display of statutes honoring prominent members of the Confederacy is tantamount to Germany displaying statutes honoring Adolph Hitler and other notorious Nazis. But you can’t even compare the actions of Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis to the actions of Adolph Hitler and other higher ups in the Third Reich. Robert E. Lee and other prominent southerners who served the Confederate States of America fought to preserve their homeland and their way of life. The president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, didn’t round up human beings who he hated and send them to concentration camps to be tortured, experimented on, and killed.

The following is a list of some of the more prominent Confederate Generals: Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, J.E.B. Stuart, Nathan Bedford Forrest, James Longstreet, Braxton Bragg, George Pickett, Bloody Bill Anderson, Albert Sidney Johnston, John Mosby, P.G.T. Beauregard, A.P. Hill, Richard Ewell, Joseph Johnston, Jubal Early, Kirby Smith, John Bell Hood, Barnard Bee, Lewis Armistead, and Porter Alexander. Also, there was Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederacy.

While it has been documented that Robert E. Lee was a good person and a fantastic general, I can’t say that I know much about the others listed above. I’m sure some of them were good and some of them weren’t. That’s true about the entire human race.

Slavery was legal, and an accepted practice in the first century of the United States of America. When you are born and raised to think something’s okay, you generally consider it okay until others may sway your thinking, or until you decide for yourself that it’s wrong based on research, observations, and ‘gut instinct.’ What I’m trying to say, and admittedly having a bit of a difficult time doing it, is that southerners or anyone else for that matter who owned slaves, and slavery was also common outside the south, and throughout the world, were not necessarily engaging in it because they wanted to do evil, whereas the desire of Hitler and the Nazis was to do evil and create a master race, thus eliminating all of those who they considered inferior. And as we have studied, many people with disabilities were executed for no other reason than that they didn’t fit the mold of the blonde haired, blue-eyed master race that was Hitler’s goal to create.

The Civil War is part of the history of the United States of America and a very important part. It represented a dark time for this country, and one that we certainly don’t want to repeat. One of the reasons that so much emphasis is placed on learning history is that history does repeat itself. In studying about the Civil War and reconstruction when I was in school, it was drilled into my head that we don’t want to ever ‘go there again.’ Secession from the Union was a terrible thing, and when I hear quips about the state of California wanting to secede from the United States, I wince.

Remember the novel, “1984,” by George Orwell? The party regularly destroyed and/or altered history. In our public schools today, and even in some of our private schools, what is taught has been altered or completely left out because it might offend some students. This is being driven by the liberals, including the teachers’ unions.

Liberals are advocating not only the destruction of statutes honoring prominent members of the Confederacy, but they are advocating changing the names of all buildings that are named after prominent Confederates. They are also advocating changing the names of schools, streets, and even towns that may have been named after anyone who had a part in the Confederacy.

Folks, that is going to be a nightmare. There’s a county in Alabama called Lee County. Will that have to be changed? Will all the towns and cities named Jackson and Jacksonville have to be changed because of General Stonewall Jackson? Will anything that has the name of Jefferson, such as Jefferson County in Alabama have to be changed? Or will anything with the common name of Davis have to be changed because it might relate back to Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederacy? Gives me a headache.

I’m hearing, though, that it might be okay to memorialize the Civil War in private museums. Well what if those museums are located where folks have to walk by them who might be offended by the contents of those museum?. Or maybe just knowing about a museum that illustrates the history of the Confederacy offends someone?

Do you really think that after directing the demolition of statutes, and changing the names of buildings, schools, streets, and even towns is going to stop the left, fueled by their overwhelming hatred for anyone who disagrees with their political philosophy, including southern white conservative Christians, from declaring war on private museums that house Confederate memorabilia? And after shutting down these private museums, do you think the left is going to stop and say, ‘job well done?’ Why stop there? Let’s force anyone who has in his or her name ‘Jackson,’ or ‘Davis,’ or ‘Lee,’ or ‘Smith’ (Kirby Smith was the name of a Confederate General), etc. to change their name because such names might be offensive to certain people.

Furthermore, I have observed from some of those who are in favor of the tearing down of the Confederate monuments, a hidden hatred for the south, even though they visit, and enjoy our food, our music, our beautiful beaches, and our weather. The hatred appears to be for the southern people who may or may not have had ancestors who owned slaves.

In other words, after accomplishing all of the above, will the left then advocate the persecution of those of us who are “southern born and southern bred?” Will they round us up and put us in internment camps?

YES! The last few paragraphs are Kabuki Theater, far-fetched, and perhaps ludicrous. But the left is currently advocating the demolition of statutes, changing street names, school names, building names where those streets, schools, and building names may relate back to the Confederacy. Making all of these changes will be a nightmare, in fact, this will be worse than a nightmare.

We have to stand up to the left now, we have to preserve our history, lest we repeat it. We have to ‘nip it in the bud.’

STOP THE LEFT AND THOSE CONSERVATIVES WHO ARE COWARDS AND ARE AFRAID OF BEING CALLED BAD NAMES! STOP THEM NOW!

And yes, I’m against the demolition of statutes and memorials honoring prominent leaders of the Confederacy.

Note: The phrase, “southern born and southern bred,” is a phrase in the Song, “My Home’s in Alabama,” performed by the country music artists, “Alabama,” and written by Teddy Gentry and Randy Owen.

 

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